Articles

 

6 Ways You Can Empower Kids with ADHD

I recently wrote this article for the new Magination Press Family site

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The Importance of Psychological Services for Children with LD

The following is a true story. Sam (not his real name) was in my office the other night with his mother. Sam is a very bright 11 and 1/2 year old with multiple learning challenges including reading, writing, and math. We talked about how Sam’s difficulty with understanding what people are saying and with putting his own thoughts and feelings into words impacts every area of his life. His mother and sister talk very fast and it is hard for him to keep up. Testing has documented that he processes information slowly. We talked about how it is difficult for him to keep up with his friends’ conversation sometimes as well.

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Emotional Consequences of Growing Up with ADHD

SAM (not his real name) was in my office last week with his mother. Sam is a very bright 11.5-year-old with ADHD as well as learning disabilities. I told him that I was speaking to a group of parents and teachers on Wednesday. Then I asked him what he would like me to tell them about what it is like for him in school. This young man, who is usually very quiet and sullen in my office, burst forth with the following statements.

“I get tired and I lose stuff. Every time the teacher calls on me there is a 25 percent chance I’ll get the right answer. I don’t like it when all the other kids have finished their tests and I’m still working. I get distracted. They do fun things and I didn’t finish my test and I’ll get all the last answers wrong because I’m distracted. And when other kids, when they yell and they aren’t listening, I don’t like it because they waste my time.” When I asked him how he feels about all of this he replied, “Upset.”

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ADHD and Divorce (a Blog article)

Life with a family member with ADHD can be stressful; wonderful in some ways, but stressful in others. People with ADHD often have a great deal of energy and enthusiasm for life. However they also lose things, forget things and are impulsive and distractible. This combination of difficulties can lead to being late for events or forgetting to pick up a child at school. It can also mean that sometimes things get said in impulsive ways that would be better off not said. All of these kinds of behaviors can lead to hurt feelings.

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ADHD and the Modern Family: One or More Houses, No Executive Functions

So, you have cleaned up the mess made by everyone getting ready for school and work, when you get a call from the school. Your son forgot his lunch/homework/trumpet and wonders if you could bring it to him. You grab it and go, then return, only to get a call from your husband. He is wondering if you can check to see if he left his reading glasses/cell phone/iPad at home and could you look for it to make sure it is safely at home and not lost between home and work. You go look, find the lost object, reassure your husband and get yourself ready for your day.

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AD/HD and Divorce Mediation

Parenting an ADHD child can be very stressful on a marriage, especially if another family member also has the disorder. While there is not much research in this area, a recent study (Wymbs, 2007) revealed that parents of children with ADHD were more likely to divorce and had shorter marriages prior to divorce than parents of children without ADHD.

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CBT for AD/HD

Cognitive behavior therapy, or CBT has it has come to be called, has been around for more than 30 years. Originally it was based on the idea that thoughts could be treated like behaviors and modified using behavioral techniques. Through subsequent research it has become very apparent that this was a correct hypothesis. CBT has been further developed by such pioneers as Dr. Aaron Beck and his daughter Dr. Judith Beck. CBT has been found to be extremely helpful in reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety, and to be helpful in a wide range of other applications as well such as anger management.

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Childhood Onset Bipolar Disorder (April 2007)

Bipolar disorder can be difficult to diagnose in children. Accurate diagnosis, however, is of vital importance to avoid inappropriate treatment. In childhood, the symptoms of Bipolar Disorder can initially look like Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and/or unipolar depression. It is well known among clinicians that if a child is treated with stimulant or antidepressant medication and there is an underlying undiagnosed bipolar disorder, the medications can induce a manic state with very serious consequences.

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Comprehensive Theraputic Assessment (June 2007)

Therapeutic assessment is a term that has been used to describe method of assessment in which assessors and clients work together to understand problems in living” (Finn, 2003). This is a way of working in which the therapist and client seek to gain a mutual understanding of the client’s strengths and weaknesses. Methods include quantitative data collection (i.e., test scores) as well as qualitative data from interviews, personal history and observations.

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Developmental Demands of AD/HD

ADHD can take a toll on a family especially due to the genetic nature of this disorder. Oftentimes several members of a family have different forms of ADHD; while the disorder is genetically linked, the specific type of ADHD can vary from person to person. One person might have more symptoms of hyperactivity, while another person might be quite forgetful and disorganized. In any case, there can be a great deal of stress and conflict in a family when one or more members have ADHD.

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Does Your Child Need Psychological Testing? (May 2006)

A parent came to see me yesterday. She was very concerned about her seven-year-old son. As we sat and talked, I could see how upset she was. She admitted that she had gone through a period of such worry that she hadn’t slept in days. She had always felt there was something different about Andrew (not his real name). He learned to read early and was already reading the Harry Potter books. He was a wiz at math. However he couldn’t tell her about anything he had read when she tried to discuss books with him.

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